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I'm about to read my first Vince Flynn novel written since he died
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47Straight
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 Posted: Wed Jan 10th, 2018 06:28 pm

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"Vince Flynn died in 2013 at the age of 47, but his popular Mitch Rapp novels live on. Flynn's family and his long-time editor Emily Bestler announced that the series will now be written by bestselling author Kyle Mills. Flynn had 15 million of his books in print. His popular character Mitch Rapp is a CIA counter-terrorism expert who faces numerous threats."

I just got back from the library with a copy of "Order to Kill". the first Mitch Rapp novel written entirely by Kyle Mills.  We'll see.

Last edited on Wed Jan 10th, 2018 06:29 pm by 47Straight

47Straight
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 Posted: Tue Jan 16th, 2018 03:17 pm

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Well,I finished it last night.  It's OK, but he is no Vince Flynn.
I may try one of those Robicheaux books that MPS and sunnyjim mentioned.

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 Posted: Sat Aug 25th, 2018 11:58 pm

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Flynn was one of my favorites. I have read some of the books written after his passing. They aren't Flynn's style.

I am constantly trying to find new authors. I'm pretty much a snob when it comes to me with new authors. It is about 1:50 or so for me.

I have a stack of 14 books behind my chair that I am going through. It is slow sledding.

I still have a few Frederick Forsythe's old books that I am just letting then set as long as I can as there are so few of his books that I don't have, yet.

Max, if you haven't read Forsythe then try "The Fist of God". Really all of his books are good.

47Straight
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 Posted: Sun Aug 26th, 2018 01:18 am

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I read all the Harry Bosch books by Michael Connelly this spring and liked them.  I read Greg Iles "Natchez Burning" trilogy last year on your recommendation and liked it a lot.  I read the rest of his stuff this summer and liked it also.  I've just started the Ben Coes series about Dewey Andreas, and they seem like they will be good.  We are entering the time of year when I usually don't read much fiction, but when football season is over I will read Frederick Forsythe.

The early Tom Clancy and Vince Flynn are the best of that genre IMHO, and I compare everything else to them.

I like American history biographies, and I checked  Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton out of the library a few weeks ago.  However, he wanted to tell me more about Hamilton than I really wanted to know.  I finally got up through his law practice after the Revolutionary war, then I skipped up to his duel with Burr, and checked it back in.

OU-31
FAU-14

Walt
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 Posted: Sun Aug 26th, 2018 08:48 pm

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Max, here are a couple of authors that I enjoy reading. They are down my list some but they are decent reads. They spin a nice story and I am hardly ever disappointed in them. Hope I am not repeating from a previous post. These are in no specific order.

Robert Crais writes some good stories and he has a couple of likable characters. His two main characters are old army buddies who are private investigators. Crais isn't in Connelly's class, but they are good and easy reads.

John Lescroart writes stories related to crime and court room drama. His lead character is a defense lawyer and his best friend is a detective. I think of Lescroart as in Crais' level. Good, well written stories with believable stories.

Scott Turow is another lawyer who also writes the same kind of court room drama stories. Turow is an excellent writer. A couple of his books have become movies. You will likely have watched this movie "Presumed Innocent" with Harrison Ford as the lead character.

One more in the Fredrick Forsythe, Vince Flynn type of stories is a writer by the name of Joel C. Rosenberg.

Rosenberg's Trilogy called the The Twelfth Imam Series is a great read, assuming you enjoy the intrigue spies weaving in and out of danger in search of the bad guys. This one is about the Iranians taking down the US Embassy back when Jimmy Carter was President. The three books are: The Twelfth Iman, The Tehran Initiative and Damascus Countdown. I have most of Rosenbergs' books and enjoyed all of them.

Now that I am at it there is one more author that I really like. The name is David Lindsey. I put most of his books in Connelly's class in terms of his stories. The deal with Lindsey books is that they are old and it is hard to find copies. I found my on Amazon. Anyway, I really like his books ... all of them are pretty good and his story lines are all pretty much different.

Just some thoughts.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 28th, 2018 10:49 pm

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You guys read deeper material than I do. I read fluff but not romance novels. I really prefer novels written back in the 20's, 30's, etc. I loved everything Catherine Cookson wrote. Loved all of James Herriott's books, Jay Cronley and I really enjoy books written by Veterinary's during their school and practices. So..yah....I can't keep up with you guys.:D

47Straight
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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 12:25 am

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Echo wrote: You guys read deeper material than I do. I read fluff but not romance novels. I really prefer novels written back in the 20's, 30's, etc. I loved everything Catherine Cookson wrote. Loved all of James Herriott's books, Jay Cronley and I really enjoy books written by Veterinary's during their school and practices. So..yah....I can't keep up with you guys.:D

Walt is the guy who reads the deep stuff.  The stuff I read is just violent with lots of dead and dying bodies laying around.  You gals with hair on your chest would probably like some of it.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 29th, 2018 10:14 am

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47Straight wrote:
Echo wrote: You guys read deeper material than I do. I read fluff but not romance novels. I really prefer novels written back in the 20's, 30's, etc. I loved everything Catherine Cookson wrote. Loved all of James Herriott's books, Jay Cronley and I really enjoy books written by Veterinary's during their school and practices. So..yah....I can't keep up with you guys.:D

Walt is the guy who reads the deep stuff.  The stuff I read is just violent with lots of dead and dying bodies laying around.  You gals with hair on your chest would probably like some of it.


Oh Boy, I will never live down the "hair on your chest" thing.

Reading is just like everything else in life. We all like different things. I'm a scientist. Things have to be realistic. If, I don't think something is logical and reasonable then I can't read it. Science fiction ... isn't my cup of tea.

Claire and I clash over movies. She can't handle brutality of any kind. If an animal is hurt she is crying and won't/can't watch it. We have a difficult time finding something we can watch together.

I'm like Max in that I read books that are violent and bloody, but the violence and blood has to be realistic and part of the story. Violence and blood for shock value and not within the plot doesn't cut it for me.

I like a story line in what I read. Then I want the writing that is to the point and not just fluff. I can't read James Patterson's work as I think it is trash. Patterson writes a book a month and there is nothing in them with the exception of what kind of shirt/tie/pants/ he/she/it wore etc. Less than 10% of the words he puts on paper have anything to do with the story it is just filler.

It is getting harder and harder for me to find good books. I am spoiled as my favorites usually do a book or two a year. So, I have to fill in some crap authors to get through until Connelly, Iles, etc publish a new one.

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 Posted: Thu Aug 30th, 2018 01:41 am

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I am with Claire...I can't watch the killing and brutality in the movies, it's just too realistic these days. I also can't watch NatGeo sometimes if it involves lions, tigers and all the other killing machines chasing down dinner. I know they have to eat but I don't have to watch it.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 31st, 2018 09:34 pm

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So sad.  Echo, I really feel sorry for you.  Sorry you never saw Lassie.  To bad.

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 Posted: Thu Sep 20th, 2018 08:36 pm

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Walt, I've read them all, even the new one, and they're all great. He is also one of my favorites.

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 Posted: Tue Sep 25th, 2018 03:05 am

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Here's one I just ran across last week--https://www.goodreads.com/series/56890-richard-hannay

Richard Hannay series by John Buchan. Published 1915-1936. Basically British secret agent who speaks multiple languages and can live in the woods for months. Early ones concern the outbreak of WWI and the British unbelief that Germany could be a problem.

Fun reads.

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 Posted: Tue Sep 25th, 2018 02:49 pm

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MoSooner2 wrote:
Here's one I just ran across last week--https://www.goodreads.com/series/56890-richard-hannay

Richard Hannay series by John Buchan. Published 1915-1936. Basically British secret agent who speaks multiple languages and can live in the woods for months. Early ones concern the outbreak of WWI and the British unbelief that Germany could be a problem.

Fun reads.


Mo have you read Frederick Forsythe?

If you like the above you would likely also enjoy the Forsythe books. His first book was "The Day of the Jackal".

I have 18 of his books and am on a hunt for the rest of them. He is one of my favorites. As you can tell I really enjoy international espionage type books. The real Tom Clancy books are very good. Beware of any of the books Clancy when he worked with other authors.

Forsythe, Rosenberg, Flynn along with Clancy are my favorites. I do read Brad Thor as well and Daniel Silva.

Reading some of the old books are always interesting to get a historical perspective. I know all of these authors write fiction. However, with many of them their books are so close to the contemporary political situation. Some make me think these authors have way to much insight into real life that they just are close to just be total fiction.

On Michael Connelly, I know the storylines of all his books are based on real events. After all, Connelly was the LA Times police beat writer for a very long time. His stories simply have to be based on real life. At least they make me believe that.

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 Posted: Tue Jun 18th, 2019 04:26 am

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Just found this thread... FWIW, I agree wholeheartedly that Michael Connelly is a cut above the competition when it comes to the crime genre.  I have read all of his books and wait with bated breath for the release of the next one.One author that I noted as omitted in the thread above that I enjoy is John Sandford, author of the Prey series, as well as the Virgil Flowers books.  He is pretty good, I think.  Agree that I can't hack James Patterson, he just cranks out volume, most of the time getting other authors to help him with it.  Bad, bad, bad.
I tend to be an omnivorous reader - I go from occasionally having to dip back into Louis L'Amour's westerns, (read most of them, still enjoy re-reading some of them, such as the Sackett books.  One historical novel by L'Amour, though, is worth reading: "The Walking Drum".  It was a 12th century historical novel.  I liked it a lot.
Science fiction - love it, especially "hard" sci-fi.  Don't much care for "hard" fantasy, stretches my credibility too much, although I am a fan of the Outlander series of books by Diana Gabaldon, a combination of time travel, and historical fiction.  I enjoy those books.Back when I was a kid, I read everything I could get my hands on by Edgar Rice Burroughs, especially the Tarzan books and the Mars series.  I collected a lot of them in hardback, have all of the Tarzan series to this day.Heinlein, Asimov, AC Clarke, other hard sci-fi authors, that was my meat and potatoes!  Especially Heinlein, I mourned his death, along with Asimov.

But these days, I read mostly crime fiction.  Like others, Robert Crais is one of my faves.  Another is David Baldacci, who has created several series that I like.I occasionally like books by Nelson DeMille, such as The General's Daughter, and Nightfall.

Kind of in a niche of their own is the partnership of Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston.  They have created a number of books with an oddball character named Aloysius Pendergast.  I find it entertaining reading.
Lee Child's Jack Reacher series of books are enjoyable to me, I've read them all - - although I refuse to watch Tom Cruise, all 5'8" of him, try to play 6'5" Jack Reacher on the screen.  Talk about a sell-out by Child!

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 Posted: Tue Jun 18th, 2019 04:36 am

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Walt wrote
Richard Hannay series by John Buchan. Published 1915-1936. Basically British secret agent who speaks multiple languages and can live in the woods for months. Early ones concern the outbreak of WWI and the British unbelief that Germany could be a problem.
I haven't read Buchan, will try to check him out.  Sounds a little like the Saint books by Leslie Charteris, back in the 30s and 40s.
Mo have you read Frederick Forsythe?

If you like the above you would likely also enjoy the Forsythe books. His first book was "The Day of the Jackal".

I have 18 of his books and am on a hunt for the rest of them. He is one of my favorites. As you can tell I really enjoy international espionage type books. The real Tom Clancy books are very good. Beware of any of the books Clancy when he worked with other authors.

Forsythe, Rosenberg, Flynn along with Clancy are my favorites. I do read Brad Thor as well and Daniel Silva.

Reading some of the old books are always interesting to get a historical perspective. I know all of these authors write fiction. However, with many of them their books are so close to the contemporary political situation. Some make me think these authors have way to much insight into real life that they just are close to just be total fiction.

On Michael Connelly, I know the storylines of all his books are based on real events. After all, Connelly was the LA Times police beat writer for a very long time. His stories simply have to be based on real life. At least they make me believe that.I also liked the early Clancy novels.  Hunt for Red October was his first and perhaps his best, although I liked most of the Jack Ryan books early on, not so much after Clancy died.

I haven't read anything by Rosenberg, will have to check him out. 

But if you like Forsythe, I think that you might like Jack Higgins books, I find them similar.
Ken Follett is another author that, while his books tend to run to be rather thick, is very good.  If you like historical fiction, you probably would like him.  I recommend "The Pillars of the Earth", particularly.

Last edited on Tue Jun 18th, 2019 04:40 am by BlackwellSooner


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